Hohenzollren Castle

Located in Stuttgart Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany - this impressive structure is actually the third such built on the mountain. The first version dated from 1267, and was destroyed by a siege from the Swabian Free Imperial States armies in 1423. In 1454, the "second" Castle Hohenzollern was constructed. During The Thirty Years War, the castle was capture by Wurttemberg troops in 1634. It remained under Habsburg control for almost 100 years. French soldiers occupied the castle in 1744 during The War for Austrian Succession (1740-1748). After the war, the Habsburg Dynasty still retained control over it, but rarely lived there. The castle began to fall into disrepair. By the 19th Century, the castle was in complete ruins.

 

Rebuilt by King Frederick William IV of Prussia in 1819, he gave it a greater glory than it ever had. Investing large sums of monies into it's renovation, Hohenzollern became a symbol for German National pride. It figured prominently into The German Romantic Period. Through the King's descendants, the castle was added to continually - up until it was considered "completed" in the 1990s! The castle defensive systems featured walls walls that are not particularly thick (they are positioned in several descending patterns running with the mountain top). The primary feature of the castle defense lies with it being built on a steep mountain top. The castle houses several fine Prussian history museums. The castle suffered some moderate damage from a 1978 earthquake. Repairs were made. The castle is a prime point for visitors wishing to see a German "dream castle".

 

 Hohenzollren Castle