Caerlaverock Castle

 

Located at Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland - this structure originally served as a Roman, Ward Law and British Hill Fort (in 960 A.D.). It's current design was said to have been constructed in the 13th Century. Caerlaverock is a "Water Castle", having a Moated defense systems completely encircling the entirety of the structure. During The First War For Scottish Independence (1299), a garrison from the castle attacked nearby Lochmanben Castle, taking it. In 1300, King Edward I and a sizable force besieged Caerlaverock Castle. Despite valiant efforts to defend it, the garrison surrendered. The castle switched ownership several times (depending on which factions were popular at the time - The Balliol or Bruce). When Robert The Bruce became King, he ordered Caerlaverock dismantled.

 

In 1355, the castle was again rebuilt. Completed in 1410, the castle became home to Catholic supporters to Mary, Queen of Scots. With her forced abdication in 1567, the last owners (Maxwell) - lost their title. This time Royalist forces used gunpowder to effectively destroy Caerlaverock. In 1593, a new owner was able to rebuilt those interior structures not previously destroyed. By 1619, more elaborate interiors were constructed. Standing in this state until 1640, Protestant forces besieged the castle for 13 weeks. Another set of demotions were carried out with the near total destruction of Caerlaverock. It was not rebuilt. Various 19th Century renovations occurred (in an attempt to preserve the surviving structures). The castle is viewable by the Public.



Caerlaverock Castle