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Monsters and Myth!

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DRACULA

                  Dracula_1.jpg      Dracula_2.jpg      Dracula_3.jpg     Dracula_4.jpg

 

The Screen version of The King of The Vampires rose from the grave in 1931, when Hungarian Actor Bela Lugosi resurrected Dracula from a successful London stage play. Base loosely on the Bram Stoker novel, Lugosi immortalized The Count (giving him many of the now iconic views when have come to expect of Dracula). The cape, ring and hypnotic stare (to control the weak minded) -  all have been incorporated into the Dracula mythos. This was a far cry from the German Silent film of 1922 called Nosferatu. Enter a little known (then), British independent film Studio named Hammer Films. Having experimented with the horror genre with Frankenstein (and then unknown British Actor Christopher Lee), the Studio naturally tried The Count (again with Lee). In 1958, the Studio gambled with The Horror of Dracula. In color and featuring foreboding sets and vast amounts of stage blood, Lee completely revamped The Count. Tall, handsome and very scary, Lee was an immediate hit as Dracula. Lee reprised his role no less than 8 times as The Count. The character propelled Hammer Studios into a powerful monster making machine (on par with Universal Studios in the 1930s and 40s). Since the Count's decline in 1974 on film  other successful attempts were made to film Dracula. Dan Curtis (of Dark Shadows TV fame), made a version with Jack Palace for TV. It was a rating hit that explored Dracula's  back story and established The Count's pathos. Another block buster attempt was made by Francis Ford Coppola in 1992. Bram Stoker's Dracula. Keeping more in track with Stoker's novel, the big budget film with British Actor Gary Oldman was an excellent take. Dracula has yet again been brought back to life in 2014 with Dracula Untold . This version incorporates a more supernatural (and a tad implausible form into the Dracula mythos). Regardless of which you prefer, after 80 years of Dracula menacing the small and big Screen, he will no doubt continue on for eternity (as The Count would no doubt appreciate!).

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THE BLOB

                                                               The_Blob.jpg

A classic piece of 1958 Sci-Fi/Horror, (with remakes, of course!) - The Blob was a space amoeba (attached to a meteor), that crashes into Earth (near a small mid-western American Town, of course). A homeless man finds the rock and touches the gooey slime. The muck attaches itself to his hand and slowly engulfs him entirely!. The more The Blob eats , the larger it gets. Eventually this proto-plasmic Monster is almost as large as a City Block!. Nothing can stop it or harm it (bombs, bullets, etc). Our lead hero finds out that cold is The Blobs nemesis. Eventually enlisting the help of The US Military, The Blob is frozen solid (after it consumes half the Town and it's population). Taken to Antartica, it remain frozen forever. Subsequent remakes make The Blob more terrifying and menacing, but still this Monster still deserves a place in The Pathenon of Monsterology.

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RAWHEAD REX

 

                                                                                  Rawhead_Rex.jpg

A 1986 Horror Film from Britain, Rawhead Rex dealt with a Medieval curse brought back to life with horrible results. Created by Middle Ages black magic, Rawhead Rex was made to fight Anglo-Saxon invaders in the 10th Century. 8 feet tall, the creature was part human and part demon (it's head was 2 times as large as normal and somewhat  boar like. Possessed of superhuman strength, Rawhead could cleave 2 warriors with a single blow. Literally unstoppable, Rawhead was tricked and sealed in a cave (for hundreds upon hundreds of years). A freak storm releases the ancient terror. Rawhead also has the power to control others with his mind. Rawhead is eventually trapped again in a rock slide and buried again (he is immortal, after all). Originally, the story was a chapter of horror Writer Clive Barker's Books of Blood (published in 1984).

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KACHINA

The Kachina legend is from the Native American Hopi Tribe. Being many centuries old, The Hopi state that The Kachina's are the spirits of their ancestors. They spirits live for thousands of years. Without form, The Hopi construct elaborate wooden dolls for these spirits to live in. All houses are supposed to possess one. Not having one may invoke an evil spirit to inhabit one's home instead. They will cause disharmony (and even death). Kachina Dolls are often made brightly painted and in various dancing poses. Hopi also construct special Kachina costumes with which they dance to attract said spirits to come and live with them. Kachinas MUST be cared for (food and water offered). Failure to care for your Kachina will cause the spirit to become upset. Destruction of a doll will bring untold disaster to the one who damaged it.

                                                                                  Kachina.jpg

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THE BOOGEYMAN

This demonic figure from myth is truly unique. Just about every culture on Earth has ''him''. Regardless of where in the World you live - chances are (when young), you heard the legend (or where terrorized by an older sibling with it!). The Boogeyman is an evil spirit with various origin stories. Some have him as being as old as biblical times (perhaps even a fallen Angel). Others place the demon several hundred years past. What is said, is that it prefers to hunt children. Living in the dark in places that are naturally scary for the very young (a dark closet, under one's bed, in an attic or down a basement). All these places can illicit fear in some small children. The Boogeyman feeds off this energy generated. Often seen as a terrifying demon-beast (again to generate fear), Boogeymen will become whatever one is afraid of. Their appearances change from place to place (and their appears to be different species of Boogeymen as well. Light (seems to scare them away). The best weapons to defend one against this creature is to simply  Grow up!

                                                                                         Boogeyman.jpg

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CRAQUEHHE

These truly evil monsters may be one of the original legends that would lead to the ever popular Zombie myths. Documented by legend around 15th Century France, The Craquehhe is basically the re-animated body of a dead human. Devoid of logic, The Craquehhe is a Hades Spirit (tasked to roam the Earth tormenting people). They are formless, and may be part of the Fallen Angel mythos. The creature prefers to inhabit the most decomposed of corpses. Perhaps his enhances it's shock effect. They sustain themselves by eating their victims (flesh and bone). Being bit (and surviving), does not mean that the victim will contract a zombie virus and become one. Being bitten by The Craquehhe means being infected by a terrible plague virus. Infected humans spread this to each other (they do not resurrect). The Black Death was thought to have been started by The Craquehhe. They can only be stopped when their host body completely breaks down and cannot be further used. Sometimes burning or chopping them to bits can stop The Craquehhe.

                                                                               Craquehhe.jpg

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Nice thread about monsters - both mythical and modern.

 

I liked the one about "The Fly". I saw the modern film on a TV broadcast, although I am not normally into horror movies (I am actually somewhat arachnophobic), and thought is was a typical modern hollywood film. Did not realize that the story goes as far back as the 50s.

 

The other stories are interesting, too. Surprising how many modern horror movies take the inspiration from medieval or even earlier legends or folk stories.

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Glad you liked it Nigel! If your a Sci-Fi fan, The original "Fly" starred David Henrickson (who was 2nd in Command of the submarine "Seaview") - from the TV Show "Voyage To The Bottom of The Sea" (mid-1960s).

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ADACHIGAHARA

A legend from 10th Century Japan, The Adachigahara is an evil goblin-like female creature. Human before she was cursed - she was a high-ranking woman who served a Prince. This Prince suffered from an unknown and unusual disease that required him to bath and consume the blood of children. Adachigahara would go out into the countryside and find unattended children, butcher them and take their blood back to her Lord. Eventually, she was caught. The Prince disavowed any knowledge of her actions. She was put to death.  Reborn to her her new state, she still prowls the countryside in search of unattended children (to drain their blood).

                                                                                       Adachigahara.jpg

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POLEVIK

The Polevik legend is told in many Slavic Countries. This creature is seen as a tall (6 foot female) apparition that wears white. Her hair is that of stalks of wheat of corn. Her two large eyes glow different colors. She is often considered a Guardian of Corn and Wheat Fields. IF she finds workers who have gotten drink and passed out in her fields -  she will strangled them to death. Many farm worker try to appease her sometime anger by offering her two infertile chicken eggs.

                                                                                 Polevik.jpg

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YARA-MA-YHA-WHO

Centuries old, this creature is a legend from The Aboriginal Tribes of Australia. The creature is a vampire-like beast around 4-feet tall and all red. It lives among the treetops. It has an enormous head and a giant (unhinged mouth). It's fingers have octopus-like suckers on them. The Yara-Ma-Yha-Who is known to swallow it's prey whole. Used to frighten children, it was said if the creature swallowed you closer to daybreak, he would regurgitate you with the first rays of The Sun!

                                                                                             Yara_Ma_Yha_Who.jpg

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THE FACELESS MAN OF PAWLEYS ISLAND

This is the legend of a spectral figure of the Man Without A Face. Going back to Charleston, South Carolina (US) lore as far back as 1822. The story tells of a beautiful young girl from a well-off Southern Family. She had her pick of the finest of young gentlemen. She chose her Cousin (who was a known scoundrel). Both families parents stopped the possible marriage (by sending the young man overseas to France), While there, he was killed in a duel (problem solved). Grief stricken, our young lass is forced to marry another man. He owned a Plantation on Pawley's Island (and they spent much time there). He was called to fight in The American Revolution (so she spent 1778 alone on the Island). One night, while walking the beach he saw wreckage of a ship on the sand nearby. As she went closer, a gray figure approached her, falling to her feet. As the girl bent down to help, she saw it was her first love -  The Cousin! Apparently, he had not died in a duel after all. Our girl had no choice but to tell him than she had married someone else. The story says that he ran off, dying later. After the War, our girl and her hero husband lived a normal life (she never told him the story). It is said on certain cold and damp nights the Man Without A Face (The Cousin), is seen wandering the beach, moaning and crying for the life he was robbed of.

                                                                                               The_Faceless_Man_of_Pawney_Island.jpg

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GREMLINS

A more modern spirit-demon, Gremlins were first spotted by British Royal Air Corps. Pilots in World War I. Seen as the cause of aircraft malfunctions and poor bomb runs, they were first thought to have been conjured by The Imperial German Air Corps. - as a way to harass their enemies (in the air). Seldom seen  (when they are), they are described as being small, hairless (or furry) little creatures  with great teeth and claws. The will try to brake cables, interfere with radio communications -  just about anything to damage or cause the aircraft to crash. The Gremlins carried onward into World War II (with American Pilots experiencing them as well). Aircraft ground crews also reported these strange goblin-like creatures. Soon, civilian Pilots began to report strange and unexplained attacks or sightings. One well documented case came from Charles Lindberg. During is cross Atlantic flight from New York to Paris, Lindberg reported hearing strange growls and voices throughout his plane. His instruments also acted oddly at times (he never reported it and only wrote about it many years later in his auto-biography). Hollywood and several modern writers have given The Gremlin a more evil and supernatural method of attack. Normally, Gremlins have no known way of being done away with.

                                                                                         Gremlins.jpg

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SLENDER MAN

A more modern type of creature, Slender Man has as many origin stories as can be possible! Originally a figure created on an Internet site, Slender Man has been linked to stories of UFOs and Extraterrestrials, to secretive Governmental Agencies bent of keeping Alien contact secrets  to actual crimes based on his commands, Slender Man has become a phenomena. Described as a very tall humanoid, Slender Man is seen in a black (or dark) business suit. His face is not seen (or simply does not exist!). He has unnaturally long arms and legs. He prefers to lurk in forests (by some accounts). Hearing him is one thing, SEEING him imparts death. He can cause paranoia and fear (even suicide)  all in an attempt to avoid being his prey. Slender Man is also said to kill his victims by slashing them to pieces (with claw-like hands), draining their blood into bags (which he keeps  it is assumed for food). He can distort electronic media and can even transfer sickness via The Internet. Slender Man can teleport to any place in The World. It is said that he is the first true Monster of The Internet.

                                                                                The_Slender_Man.jpg

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THE VAMPIRE OF DUSSELDORF

This real Monster terrorized The City of Dusseldorf, Germany for almost 1 year in 1929. His real name was Peter Kurten. Born poor, he witnesses the continued sexual assaults of his his father against his mother and sister (as a very young age). Kurten may have been responsible for the drowning of two boys when he was 9 years old (ruled an accident). Kurten was known to torture and kill small animals when he was a teenager. He was convicted of burglary, theft and a host of other petty crimes. After completing his latest prison sentence - he moved back to Dusseldorf in 1923 (and married). Having a penchant for sexual depravity (all manners) -  this obviously mentally disordered man began a reign of serial killings unheard of at the time. In 1929, he murdered a 9 year old girl (and molested her after death). Next, Kurten stabbed to death a Mechanic (inflicting 20 wounds). In August of 1929, he raped and killed another woman (and killed 3 more the same way  by stabbing, all within 15-minutes of each incident!). By October, Kurten had taken to beating his victims with a hammer (of the 4 known, 2 survived their rape and attempted death). In keeping with the infamous London Serial Killer Jack The Ripper, Kurten even sent letters (and maps of the locations of his victims) to local Police (as if taunting them). Kidnapping his last victim outside his home, he took her to the nearby woods and raped her. He did not kill her. The victim went to The Police and led them straight to Kurten's home. He was arrested.During questioning, a confident Kurten admitted to all his depravities and crimes. His testimonies were very matter of factly. Kurten also admitted to drinking the blood of may of his victims. Tried and convicted  he was sentenced to death (by Guillotine). Over the next several months, Kurten was interviewed by noted Psychologist Karl Berg. Berg used his notes to help advance what would eventually become Criminal Behavioral Sciences (a valuable tool for profiling Serial Killers in later years). Kurten (ever) the ghoul, asked Dr. Berg if (after he was beheaded), would be be able to see and hear (wishing to hear his own blood pumping from his neck!)We will never know if Kurten had his last desire fulfilled -  he was executed in 1931

                                                                         The_Vampire_of_Dusseldorf.jpg

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PENNYWISE THE CLOWN

The Monster which inhabits American Writer Stephen King's world of IT. Originally a novel and then Television mini-series, the story tells of a group of young children and their encounters with a fiend name Pennywise The Clown. The Clown is in reality an inter-dimensional being many centuries in age (if not older). The true appearance of Pennywise is unknown. It is said that to see it's true form would cause one to go instantly insane. The creature feeds off of what truly scares and terrifies you. The creature's goal is to scare one to death (although it is responsible for the direct death's of many victims over the centuries). The form of a Clown (Pennywise), is the ultimate attack form. He will use simple to complex trickery (and your fears) to trap you. Although IT cannot be killed, one's belief in what can kill imaginary beasts, can be used against IT. British Actor Tim Curry starred as the evil Clown in the American miniseries, which was released in 1990.

                                                                                         Pennywise_The_Clown.jpg

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These articles are particularly interesting. Now you also mentioned some of those modern monsters... I am surprised to hear that stories about gremlins originated from 20th century, and that it had to do with Germans. Another interesting thing to me about that is the fact that pilots were (and are) educated people, and yet they gave us those stories. Of course, I do not judge or anything like that, and indeed, they weren't speaking about anything paranormal. Oh, and I find interesting the picture of the gremlin holding the tool. :)

 

I liked the story about Pennywise the clown... It's one of the classics, and although I would like to see those the shows and movies that left a great trace in our history, I don't find enough time for that. Truth to be told, I do have some time for that, but I'm spending it on watching Stargate. :)

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I have always thought that the Gremlins myth was to cover up "bad" maintenance work! (Ha). Who knows, Sea Captains are just as bad! As for Pennywise (IT), it is one of King's great stories (next to The Stand, my favorite). The mini-series skirts many important facts from the book. That's okay, I am sure you'll find time to see it. I too went through my "Stargate" phase. Like the earlier Seasons, though!

Glad you liked the stories! :D

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THE MUMMY

The long dead Mummy of screen and film originally came to life in 1932 as one of American film Studio  Universal's, member of their Classic Monster series. The film cashed in on the very lucrative Ancient Egyptian art and cultural finds starting with King Tut in 1922. Mummies were all the rage for most Museums and Sideshows throughout The World. In screen format, we find an Ancient Egyptian Priest (Imhotep), who falls in love with a Princess. Dying young, Imhotep is heartbroken. But, being a High Priest has it's advantages. Stealing The Scroll of Thoth (which when recited, will re-animate the dead body and soul), Imhotep is caught by Pharaoh's Guards. Cursed, he is buried alive (with The Scroll). Discovered some 3,000 years later, Archaeologist's accidentally read The Scroll and bring back our Priest. Having developed more powers and strength (evil) over the centuries, Imhotep assumes the guise of an expert in Ancient Egypt. Meeting the daughter of one of his rescuers (who is actually the reincarnation of his long dead love). Imhotep (using his mind control abilities), steal her away (so he can resurrect her memories and the two can live forever). Our heroine, (vaguely remembering some of her missing past life)  pleads before a statue of The Goddess Isis (for help). Imhotep instantly dissolves. Popular, The Mummy (again starring famed Frankenstein Actor Boris Karloff), spawned around 5 indirect sequels. A somewhat popular Monster in the 1950s, English Hammer Studio kept the immortal Priest alive for 3 movies. Allowed to rest until 1999, Universal resurrected Imhotep (giving him a slightly different back story and much more realistic special effects). Part horror and action-adventure, the rebooted Mummy had generated 2 sequels (with the possibility of several more).

                                                                 The_Mummy_2.jpg         The_Mummy_1.jpg

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THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA

Most screen versions taken from the 1909 French Writer Gaston Leroux novel The Phantom of The Opera, are most often heavily adapted (depending on the Studio and time period). Considered a Gothic tale of romance and horror, the first and most famous version was the 1925 classic silent film. Starring the Master and Grandfather of Movie Monster make-up - Lon Chaney Sr; his rendition of Leroux'  Phantom still hold up today. The classic and iconic unmasking scene (often imitated), still is considered one of the scariest moments on film. The story of this movie Monster is even more close to our sense of human fears. The Phantom is actually one of us. In the original version  Erik (The Phantom's real name), was born with a horribly deformed face. Lacking a nose, lips, eyelids and a face that appeared much as a living skull - he is shunned by society (even his mother puts him into an orphanage). A series of crimes has Eric being sent ot the infamous prison Devil's Island. Escaping, he makes his way to Paris, living (and learning music) underneath The Paris Opera House. Using stage props and old wardrobe, Eric transforms himself in the role of The Phantom. In short, trying to find love, he falls for a young singer (Christine)  loses her to a handsome beau (Raoul) and  after a series of murders, is chased through Paris (to be captured by a Mob of citizens  beaten and drown in the river). Traditionally, our Phantom dies at his organ (heartbroken at Christine leaving with Raoul). As horror movies matured so did the need to scare the audience. By the 1940s, expensive color films needed a draw. So, a Phantom needed a better back story (and suitable gory make-up). Now, The Phantom of The Opera was a mild mannered (and unknown Composer). Having his work stolen by a greedy Publisher (and taking credit), our new Phantom goes to this crook to get his property. After a proper fight scene, Printer's Acid is thrown into the Composer's face. Horribly scarred, our Composer hides away underneath The Paris Opera House (add the rest of the story, now). The Phantom has been made less deformed (and sometimes even more handsome), as time and tastes have advanced. He even has taken Broadway by storm. But still, we always have our own personal Phantom favorite  to haunt our personal dreams.

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DORIAN GRAY

Title character from British Writer Oscar Wilde (written in 1890), The Picture of Dorian Gray is another story which serves as a warning. Dorian is a young and handsome man (quite wealthy by means of an inheritance). He is somewhat vain and self-centered. While posing one day for a portrait, he muses with the Painter about wishing to remain young and attractive forever. This, Dorian feels  is a youth's primary goal in life (for pleasure, wealth and the finer things in life are wasted on the Older set of Society). This view is a total reversal on the process of wasted youth, a common view in the 19th Century. Dorian's wish is answered by some unknown malevolent force. Dorian begins to notice that he has stopped aging and further feels little or no remorse or guilt for anything he does (or doesn't do). As time goes forward, Dorian notices that his portrait is taking on a more harsher and older appearance. The more excess Dorian indulges in the worse the painting appears. Open sores and disease begin to appear on the portrait (as if by magic). Dorian suspects that his evil nature is beginning to manifest itself through his painting. He locks it up to keep it save. Years go on. Still Dorian does not age. He has a reputation as a cruel man. He lives a sinful and heartless life. Dorian checks his painting through the years (which now resembles an aged demon-like  horrid face). Yet, Dorian remains young and handsome. He even commits murder (with all the guilt and horror of the act going into his painting). Eventually, Dorian begins to see the evil of his ways, and becomes remorseful (having finally fallen in true love - but wishing to free himself of his curse). Going to his painting, Dorian see's the image of him in his portrait as a monster. Taking a knife and stabbing the portrait, Dorian screams and falls dead. Servants burst into his study to find an aged and demonic shriveled figure lying dead on the floor. The picture of Dorian Gray hangs on the wall, now young and handsome again. This story was a very popular tale. Made into a movie at least 10 times since 1915, the 1945 version with British Actor Hurd Hatfield is probably the best known. Often adapted with a Faustian overtone, some versions have featured a more supernatural approach to this Gothic take on the most terrifying monster Man can encounter -  himself!

                                                                                            The_Picture_of_Dorian_Gray.jpg

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HERBERT WEST

Hero of American Horror Writer H.P. Lovecraft's 1922 novelette Herbert West- Re-Animator, the truly terrifying story was made into an American Horror film Re-Animator in 1985. Full of typical Lovecraft gore and blood, the story tells of a young and idealistic Medical Student, bent on stopping unnecessary death (ala Frankenstein). West invents a formula by which dead organs can be brought back to life. His experiment first attempts to bring back life to small animals. West soon discovers that while his fluid brings his subjects back to life, they are souless, and blood-thirsty undead zombie creatures. The Dean of the Medical School (a biter old man who felt he was cheated of fame in his own Medical career), tries to steal West's formula. A fight with an accidental decapitation of The Dean, causes West to re-animate The Dean's head! Brought back to life, the now VERY evil Dean begins to order (and control) other re-animated corpses (to West's dismay). In the end, all evidence is destroyed by West (who is arrested for murder!). Saved by reason of insanity (and imprisonment in an Insane Asylum), West's formula falls into other hands (with possible future experiments and horrors just around the corner).

                                                                             Herbert_West_Re_Animator.jpg

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FURYS

Ancient Greece and Rome identified Furies as personifications of vengeance. Depicted as hideous females, they had long talons and were often dressed in black. Some variations have Furies with serpents in their hair (as with a Gorgon). Sometimes seen with the wings of bats or birds, they also carried whips (which they would use on their victims. Originally tasked with guarding the Gates to Tartarus, there were also 3 who are featured (and named), in ancient texts. Megara (who represented Jealousy), Tisphone (who was The Avenger) and Alecto (who was The Unresting One). They were harassers (and would not normally kill their prey). The breaking of oaths and murder were but just some of the crimes that they would avenge. Their primary goal was to drive the offender to suicide.

                                                                                    Furies.jpg

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DAMBALLA WEDO

Another of Haiti's Voodoo inspired myths, The Damballa is a part-serpent, part-human creature. It is a house dwelling spirit that will take occasional possession of a living member of one's family (if displeased). The Damballa communicates by hisses. It often causes the possessed to have white eyes when he is present. An offering of an infertile egg and honey will keep Damballa happy. IF not, the possessed person will retain Damballa's spirit (to the terror of the other family members!)

                                                                                        Damballa_Wedo.jpg

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SPLINTERCAT

From the Upper North American Logging communities, come the story of Splintercat. Going back to late 18th Century Northwest America, it was said by those hearty Lumberjacks, that this cat-like creature lived high among the tree tops. Possessed of lighting speed, Splintercat could run along the tops of the trees (doing it's best to avoid the Loggermen). Splintercat can stand upright (as a man), is when seen is pale white or silvery in color. Needing bee honey to eat, Splintercat will use his head to crack open trees to scoop out bee honey. This gives Splintercat fearsome headaches. Often (in this condition), Splintercat will get annoyed with Loggers cutting down his tree homes and attack.

                                                                  Splintercat.png

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